The 24/18 13/11 Opening Play in Backgammon

A favorite play for the for the six-two opening roll in backgammon is to do 24/18 13/11. Let's take a look at this approach to the six-two opening roll and compare it to the other candidate plays and see how it fares. We'll begin with a brief comparison of each of the favorite plays for a backgammon opening roll of six-two.

The three favorite plays for the six-two opening roll in backgammon are 24/18 13/11, 24/16, and 13/5. Doing a 24/16 is an approach to the opening roll that runs a back checker, a form of backgammon running play. A 13/5 play for this opening roll slots the five-point using a builder from the mid-point. A bit risky but plays aggressively for this important point. Doing 24/18 13/11 is a balanced approach to this backgammon opening roll, which tries to develop both sides of the board.

These three plays share at least one thing in common, and that is they all take some considerable risk. A 24/16 play for this opening roll seems like a backgammon running play but runs into a slight risk from the checkers on your opponent's mid-point (i.e 12-point).

A 13/5 play slots your five-point on the backgammon board. Be prepared for a fight since this is a very important point on the board. You should expect your opponent to hit that checker. If that checker does get hit, you'll be 20 pips behind in the backgammon game.

Doing a 24/18 13/11 (the favorite play of many backgammon players) slots the bar-point on your opponent's side of the board. That is another important point on the backgammon board. You can and should also expect your opponent to hit this blot.

All these backgammon plays incorporate a margin of risk. Now let's turn to the 24/18 13/11 play and try see why many backgammon players favor this over the others.

An interesting combination is to put an element of aggression, a threat to build and block off, mixed with a tint of risk. This is exactly what the 24/18 13/11 play does on the backgammon board. You threaten to close out your opponent's back checkers by bringing down a builder from the mid-point.

That builder is quite safe from most attacks but one, a low risk position. You threaten to close out the bar-point on your opponent's side, aggressive and smart (since the bar-point is a great defensive position in backgammon).

You can readily see this play as a power three-pronged assault that can put a lot of pressure on your opponent. Just remember that though this is a really strong move, you should still consider the risk involved.


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